J. Dana Trent

Author of the interfaith memoir, Saffron Cross

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4 Comments

  1. Thank you firstly for your openess regarding your faiths and relationships. I want to say I am the daughter of a Baptist minister. I have never really called myself a practicing individual until about 5 months ago. After having suffered a violent marriage (to a born again Christian) and than another relationship that had so much infidelity…. I never wanted to get married again! However that all changed 5 months ago. I felt a calling and I answered. My life began to change and my mindset changed as well. That through all the suffering and hurt God wants us to be happy, to be loved…. and I realized that God has a man out there for me and I began to pray for my future husband. 2 weeks later I met someone that I never thought would be in my life a Hindu, Indian born man. 🙂 The Love, tenderness and kindness this man has shown me is nothing that I have ever experienced. Than the doubt of what I am doing slipped in about not being with a “believer”…. I began researching the more research the more confused I became…. I wrestled with this for weeks. I am sure you know that there are posts of Hinduism is witchcraft and so forth….. but in my heart I felt that this man has shown nothing to me but caring, attentiveness and Love. I believe that there is a reason that we are in each others lives and I surrendered that if this is God’s will let it be… whatever trail it will be fine. So thank you for posting and thank you for sharing. I am at peace with my decision and for that I am eternally grateful. ~Sharon

    • Sharon:

      Thank you SO MUCH for reading and for sharing this story. What a journey you’ve had! I’m grateful for your experience, your wisdom, and that you’ve landed precisely where you are supposed to be. Amen, and amen.

      Deep peace and gratitude for you,
      Dana

  2. Hi Dana,
    I am a christian. I recently started dating and fell in love with a Muslim(He was born in an interfaith family. His dad is muslim, his mum is christian) and his siblings are mixed. Some are christian, some muslim. He wants us to get married and I’m okay with it. But then I get scared when I hear stories of people that get married in different religions and then when they marry they force each other to convert to the others religion ( I’m African and here they take religion extremely serious, along with submissiveness and all). Your blog and your replies have been really encouraging especially your response to the “unequally yoked scripture “. But it’s been a scary road to walk especially with zero encouragement from people around me. everyone is telling me to leave the relationship because apart from the religious differences there is also a tribal difference because we are from different tribes as well. Putting those two aside he’s a great guy and when it’s both of us alone it’s perfect. But when I consider what’s outside our bubble I feel scared and alone. Recently I’ve been struggling with how to break the news to my parents. I feel they will not accept him and that I’ll break their hearts because of my choice. (And I was right about that part. Mom started having chest pains). And please how did you finally accept yourself and your decision? I find myself struggling all the time and being swayed by people’s opinions and this has started to affect my relationship as well. My boyfriend thinks I need to find myself and I agree. But I don’t know how. The fear is intense.

    • Ana:

      Thanks so much for reading and for commenting.

      I can only imagine how you must feel–this is a delicate situation (especially with your mother’s reaction). I can understand why you have fear, and why you are looking to others for an opinion.

      I found acceptance and peace with my decision to be in an interfaith relationship/marriage when I took a step back and saw how much joy, growth, and depth it was offering me. Being in partnership with a Hindu actually deepened my Christian faith. I realized I could not achieve that depth elsewhere (even in my home church), because I wasn’t placed in a position in which I asked myself tough questions about my spirituality, religion, and doctrine.

      I think you have to ask yourself what’s more important: your precious relationship and a deepening of your faith, or what other’s think? Of course, that’s difficult, so my advice is to take it one day at a time.

      Please keep me updated.

      Deep peace and prayers for you!

      Dana

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